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Welcome to Cardmeister


Permutations

Welcome to Cardmeister!



What is Cardmeister?

Cardmeister is a web page designed to introduce high school students to three areas of discrete mathematics: permutations, combinations, and probability. Discrete mathematics is the study of mathematical properties of sets and systems which have a countable number of elements. Permutations, combinations, and probability are only one small area of discrete math. To learn more about discrete math subjects like graph theory, matrices, and sequences, check out the math links.

Where do I begin?

Since each lesson builds on the previous section, it is suggested that one go through the lessons of Cardmeister sequentially, starting with the lesson on permutations.

How should Cardmeister be used?

In the general high school curriculum, discrete mathematics topics are not covered in great detail. Cardmeister could be a good source of enrichment for students who are either interested in mathematics or would like to do an extra credit project.

Another use of Cardmeister might be as an instructional tool. Instead of lecturing, the instructor could bring students to the webpage and have them discuss the problems. While students are working through the lesson, the teacher may walk around and assist students as necessary.

Questions and Comments

I am very interested in any questions, comments, or constructive criticism involving Cardmeister. Please see the feedback section for more information.

Bibliography

Grimaldi, Ralph P. Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics: An Applied Introduction. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1994.

Lipschutz, Seymour. Schaum's Outline of Theory and Problems of Probability. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1965.

Long, Calvin and DeTemple, Duane. Mathematical Reasoning for Elementary Teachers. New York: HarperCollins, 1996.

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics. Reston, VA: NCTM, 1989.


Combinations


Probability


Math Links


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